The Worland Family in America and Beyond

I began my life in the Puget Sound area of Washington State, on an island filled with forests and wild rhododendrons. I was separated from my Worland family there at an early age. Recently, I was reunited with my family and learned of my heritage. And so, this journey to know my ancestors began. The Worlands, Gideons, Newtons, Conards... they were the colonists, the settlers, the pioneers. They fought in the American Revolution, the War of 1812, the Civil War. This is their story, and the story of a nation. -Deci Worland MacKinnon

Sunday, January 31, 2010

1728 Leonardtown

Leonardtown is located in St. Mary's County, Maryland. It was originally named Seymour Town in honor of Governor John Seymour. In 1708 it was designated the county seat. In 1728 the town was renamed Leonardtown in honor of Leonard Calvert, first colonial governor of Maryland.

1728 Maryland


1728- John Digges obtained a tract of land called Back Lands from Lord Baltimore, part of which he transferred in 1728 to Arnold Livers, the former Flemish page.
Arnold Livers divided his part into tracts called Slate Ridge Farm, Ogle’s Good Will, Lubberland, Duke’s Woods, Arnold’s Chance and Arnold’s Delight.

("Lubberland" was the 17th century perjorative for the New World, a fool's paradise of idleness and plenty. American Laughter: Immigrants, Ethnicity and 1930s Hollywood Film Comedy )

Although Arnold Livers lived in Prince George’s County at a plantation called Timberley, he had a second home at Arnold’s Delight in the forks of Owings Creek.

This photo shows the valley where the Zentz mill and farm was formerly located. The stone posts shown here give a glimpse into the past, showing where the old lane to the Zentz Mill and farm used to begin. This photo was taken at the overlook at Payne’s Hill, just off US Rt. 15 south. Slate Ridge Farm-A Short Story.

(Arnold Livers is my fifth great grandfather.)


May 20, 1728- Solomon Stimson 9.157 A PG £198.17.9 £110.4.6
Received from: MM John Hyde & Co. (merchants in London), Thomas Charter, John Mawdesty,
Payments to: Robert Tyler, William Elder, William Hardey, John Kirkwood, Joseph Noble.
Legatees: Solomon Stimson, Benjamin Stimson, Anny Stimson (daughter) wife of William Hardy.
Executrix: Elisabeth Stimson.

(Solomon Stimson is my sixth great grandfather. Benjamin Stimson is his son. His daughter Ann was married to William Hardy. William Hardy is my fifth great grandfather.)

May 20, 1728- William Elder marries Ann Wheeler in Prince George's County, Maryland. In 1728, William is among a party of Catholics who travel into the interior of Frederick County, Maryland on an exploratory trip. He settles first at Zentz's Mill, clearing the land and building a home before moving his new family there. William was good friends with Arnold Livers, and he is soon followed to Frederick County by the Livers, Owings, Wheelers, and other Catholic families.
In William Elder's time, things were quite primitive in Maryland. Cloth was made by local weavers, underwear and house linen at home. Men wore breech cloths and deerskin jackets, caps and moccasins. People lived well, but simply, hunting and dressing their own meats, making their own bread, corncakes, sorghum, etc., and of course were almost unacquainted with tea and coffee.

June 18, 1728- After Solomon Stimson's death, his wife Elizabeth [Finch] was executrix of his estate.
This second inventory is cited in the amount of £6.14.0.

Mr. James Beall 9.211 A PG £43.2.3 Jun 18 1728:

Payments to: John Allison, Anne Gitting, administratrix of Francis King, Elienor Nutthall, John Roads, John Beall, Sr., Capt. Charles Beall, Meredith Davis per Dr. Haswell, John Pearce, William Beall, Sr., James Beall (son of Alexander Beall), Mary Jones, William Scott, Capt. Leonard Hollyday on account of Thomas Brooke (merchant in London), John Farguson, cost of suit against Dr, John Haswell and his wife Sarah Haswell, Elisabeth Stimson (executrix of Solomon Stimson) per John Mawderley to be paid in my father's (unnamed) lifetime, William Smith & William Mordant, Lingan Wilson, Robert Beall, Esq. Loyd per Mr. Robert Taylor, Edmond Jenings, Charles Calvert, Esq., Holland, Lee & Brooke, Brooke & Holland.

Mentions: Mr. Jennings, widow (unnamed), 8 children (unnamed).

Executor: John Beall, Jr.

Oct 16 1728- Solomon Stimson 9.75 A PG £23.1.7 Oct 16 1728
Payments to; Mary Williams, Philemon Lloyd, Esq., Thomas Brooke & William Holland & Thomas Addison, Esq., Mr. Alexander Fraser, James Ranter.

Legatees: William Elder, Thomas Elder.

Executors: Peter Hoggins and his wife Elisabeth Hoggins.

(Elizabeth Finch is my sixth great grandmother. Peter Hoggins was her third husband, whom she married following Solomon Stimson's death.)


1728- Kezia Hackett born in St. Mary's, Maryland.

Saturday, January 30, 2010

George Bush's Remarks

Vice President George Bush's Remarks at Tricentennial Ceremony of German Immigration to America, Krefeld, June 25, 1983

Three centuries ago, after a 75-day voyage across the Atlantic in a cramped ship, 32 Mennonites and Quakers from Krefeld and two infants that had been born during the passage landed on the East Coast of the New World. It was October, the air had grown crisp and the autumn rains had begun. Exhausted and sick after their voyage, the Germans trudged from Philadelphia, then a settlement with two dirt roads, through six miles of dense forest to found a settlement of their own.

As winter approached they chopped down scores of trees and built their first homes of logs. "It may neither be described nor believed," wrote Franz Daniel Pastorius, the Krefelders' leader, "under what conditions of need and poverty...this German township was founded."

Yet the Germans had found what they came for, freedom of worship, and in a modest way their settlement soon began to thrive, the people grew flax, raised sheep for wool, and became known in the American colonies for their weaving. News of their success encouraged other Germans to leave the Old World for the New...

...Three hundred years ago, when that first ship set sail for the New World from Krefeld, one of those on board was named Thones Kunders. Eight generations later the family name had changed from Kunders to Conrad, and Charles Conrad, Jr., a direct descendant of Thones, became an astronaut and walked on the moon...

1729 Pennsylvania

September, 1729- Thones Kunders dies in Germantown, Pennsylvania. He is buried in the Friends Burying Ground in Haddonfield, New Jersey.

(Thones Kunders is my eighth great grandfather. He was also known as Dennis Cunrads.)

Will of Thones Kunders

In the name of god. Amen.

I, Dennis Cunrads of Gerntown in the County of Philadelphia in the Province of Pensilvania being not of perfect health of body but of sound and Perfect mind and memory Praise be therefore given to almight God Do make and Ordain this my last Will and Testment in manner and form following (that is to say) first and Principally I Commend my Soul into the hands of Almighty God hopeing through the merts of Jesus Christ to have full and free pardon of all my sins, and to Inherit everlasting Life, and my body I Commit to the Earth to be Decently Berryed at the Discretion of my Executors hereafter named---And as touching the Disposition of all such Temporal Estate as it hath pleased God to Bestow upon me I Give and Dispose thereof as followeth.

Imprimis:-It is my will that all my Debts and funeral Charges be paid and Discharged.

Item. I Give and bequeath unto (my Son In Law) Griffith Jones The Dwelling house wheren I, (and the s-d Griffith Jones) now Dwell, and the Lot thereunto belonging Containing fifty acres of Land together with the Barns Stables Orchards Outhouses Stills ( and Dying Kettle) Worms and Worm tubbs thereunto belonging To have and to hold the sd Land with the Premises and appurtenances thereunto belonging to him the sd Griffith Jones his heirs and assigns To the only proper use and behoof of him the sd Griffith Jones and his heirs and assigns forever, He the sd Griffith Jones finding and allowing Anthony Loofe (now living with me) suffecient meat and drink, washing and lodging and apparrell So long as the sd Anthony Loffe Shall Live, And It is my will that my said Son In Law Griffith Jones Pay for the sd Land and Premises, the sum one hundred and fifty Pounds of Lawfull money of Pensilvania After the Death of the sd Anthony Loofe the said L150 (150 pounds) to be equally divided amongst my children That is to say Cunrad Cunrads Mathias Cunrads, John Cunrads, Henry Cunrads Ann Streepers Agnes Powell and Elisabeth Jones, Each to have an Equal share and share alike of the sd One hundred and fifty Pounds To them and their heirs forever.

Item. I Give and bequeath unto my sd Children, Cunrad, Mathias, John, Henry, Ann, Agnes and Elisabeth All the REst and Remainder of my Estate, both Personal and Reall to be Equally Divided amonst them Each of my sd Children to have and to hold an Equall Share of the Remaind of my sd Estate to them (inseverally) and to their heirs and assigns forever.

Lastly, I do hereby nominate, Constitue and appoint my sd Son Cunrad Cunrads and my sd Son In Law Griffith Jones to be Joynt Executors of this my Last Will and Testament hereby witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this nineteenth day of June in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seven hundred and Twenty-Two.

Beit Known That before the Delivery and Sealing hereof I Give and Bequeath to (my above named Son-In-Law) Griffith Jones The bed and furniture Standing in the New Room To be for the use of friends.

Witness my hand and Seall the day and year above written.

DENNIS KUNDERS (seal)

Sealed Signed Published and Declared in the Presence of us

PETER SHOEMAKER

DIRK JANSEN

DAVID HEY

Thones Kunders and His Children: Also a List of the Descendants for 6 Generations of His Youngest Son Henry Cunreds of Whilpain, 1683-1891

Friday, January 29, 2010

1729 Maryland

1729- Elizabeth Finch dies in Charles County, Maryland, at age 42.
Elizabeth Finch had lived her life on the plantation Goodwill, which was originally purchased in 1681 by her father, Guy Finch. It was located north of and adjoined the plantation Timberly, which was owned by Arnold Livers.
Elizabeth's third husband Peter Hoggins dies one year later in 1730. It was a brief union, they had married in 1728.

(Elizabeth Finch is my sixth great grandmother.)

The Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland, 1726-1733 By Elise Greenup Jourdan
Liber M, Page 586

Enrolled at request of David Craufurd 1 May 1730:
Indenture, 19 Feb 1729; between Arnold Livers, merchant, and David Craufurd, merchant, for 1s; half of lot #73 between Livers and John Miles in Upper Marlborough; wit. Clement Hill, John Docwra; 1 May 1730 ack. by Arnold Livers and Hellen his wife.

(Arnold Livers is my fifth great grandfather.)

1729- Son, William Elder, is born to William Elder and Ann Wheeler in Frederick County, Maryland. He is the grandson of Elizabeth Finch, who dies the same year. (Elizabeth Finch married three times: Solomon Stimson, William Elder, Peter Hoggins.)

(William Elder is my 1st cousin six times removed.)

October 23, 1729- Solomon Stimpson 9.480 A PG £21.18.11 Oct 23 1729

Received from: Mr. William Digges, Moses Orme.
Payments to: Charles Calvert, Esq., Alexander Countee, Simon Nicholls, Mr. Alexander Fraser, Mr. Alexander Contee, Lingan Wilson, Leonard Holliday garnishee of Thomas Brooke & Co., Mr. Robert Tyler.

Executors: Peter Hoggins and his wife Elisabeth Hoggins.

(Solomon Stimson is my fifth great granduncle. Solomon Stimson and Elizabeth Finch are his parents. Peter Hoggins is his stepfather.)

1730 Pennsylvania

1730- Ann Potts is born to David Potts and Elizabeth Lane in Germantown, Pennsylvania. The same year, the family suffers the loss of her granduncle, David Potts.

(Ann Potts is my fifth great grandaunt. David Potts is my seventh great granduncle. We share Thomas Potts and Elizabeth Baset as common ancestors.)

Monday, January 25, 2010

1730 Maryland

July 4, 1730- John Hyde of London leases to George Hardee 245 acres called His Lordship's Mine. The lease will run for the lifetimes of George, his wife Elizabeth and son William.

The Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland, 1726-1733 By Elise Greenup Jourdan
Liber Q Page 75- Enrolled at request of William Hardy 26 Aug 1730:

Indenture, 24 Jul 1730; Between John Hyde of London, merchant, and William Hardy, planter; for 5s; to farm part of His Lordship's Kindness; containing 161 acres; for the natural life of William Hardy, Anne his wife and George their son; /s/ Walter Hoxton, atty. for John Hyde; wit. James Burgess, Tho. Charter; 3 Aug 1730 ack. by Walter Hoxton

(William Hardy is my fifth great grandfather. George Hardy is William's brother, therefore my fifth great granduncle. Our common ancestors are William & Elizabeth Hardy.)


1730- Ann Bacon is born to Henry Bacon and Frances Smith in St. Mary's, Maryland.

Charles Elder is born to William Elder and Ann Wheeler in Frederick County, Maryland.

(Ann Bacon is my fifth great grandmother. Charles Elder is my 1st cousin six times removed.)

Sunday, January 24, 2010

1731 Pennsylvania

March 27, 1731- Abraham Isaac Op den Graeff has died in Philadelphia. His tract of 530 acres in "The Dutch Township" along the Perkionen is divided among his surviving children.

(Abraham Isaac Op den Graeff is my 1st cousin ten times removed. Our common ancestors are Herman Op den Graeff and Gretjen Driessen Pletjes.)


May 27, 1731- The "Pennsylvania Gazette," of May 27, 1731, contains the following advertisement:

 "Run away from David Potts, at Socken above the Great Swamp, A Servant Boy named John Williams, about seventeen Years of Age, of swarthy complexion, has black Hair, and two Molds on his Forehead. Had on a brown linsey-woolsey Jacket, Leather Breehes, a pair of Shoe packs, and Stockings footed White. He is supposed to have with him a Big Bay Horse, with a Switch Tail, and a Star in the Forehead, a helf crop and a half penny in the Ear, and branded on the near Shoulder I P with a Dagger, over it. Whoever secures him and gives notice to George Shoemaker, Innkeeper, in Philadelphia, so that his Master may have him again, shall have Forty Shillings Reward, and Reasonable Charges paid, by DAVID POTTS."

The brand I P may have been the initials of Jonas Potts, who probably contributed to his son's start in life.

The Great Swamp was a marshy tract of land in the upper end of Bucks County, including the village of Quakertown. Saucon is the name of a creek emptying from the south-west into the Lehigh River, a few miles below Bethlehem. Before the year 1730, some Philadelphia speculators bought up large tracts of the rich lands in the Saucon valley and sold it out in smaller parcels.

(David Potts is my sixth great grandfather.)

David Potts of Loudoun County, Virginia and his descendants.

May 29, 1731- Women's Monthly Meeting of Friends in Gwynned.

att our Monthly Meeting held att Gwynedd the 29 of 5 mo 1731:

George Burson and Sarah Cocks Declared their intention of marriage with each other the first time - Elizabeth Jacob and Rachel Star are appointed to inspect into her clearness and conversation and bring report to the next Meeting.

by Account received from the severall branches belonging to this Meeting we have to report that Love and unity is in a generall way preserved among frds Meeting are kept up and a concern remains upon the minds of frds to maintain and put the Christian Discipline in practice and due care is taken of the poor.

Rebecca Roger and Rachel Pott, Eliza Ellis are appointed to attend the Quarterly Meeting att Philadelphia

att our Monthly Meeting held att Gwynedd the 31 of 6 mo 1731:

George Burson and Sarah Cocke Declared their intention of Marriage with each other the second time and being left to their Liberty to proceed in their intention - Eliza Richardson and Mary Jacobs are appointed to attend the marriage and see it be orderly accomplished.

Abraham Dawes and Mary Harry declared their intention of Marriage with each other the first time - this Meeting appoints Ellin Meredith and Rachel Potts to inspect into her Clearness and conversation and bring report thereof next Meeting.

July 9, 1731- George Burson marries Sarah Cox at Gilbert's Manor.
att our Monthly Meeting held att Gwynedd the 22 of 7 mo 1731:

The frds appointed Last Meeting to attend the marriage of George Burson and Sarah Cocks reported it was orderly accomplished.

Abraham Daws and Mary Harry Declared their intention of Marriage the second time - Ellin David and Rachel Potts are appointed to attend the Marriage and bring account to the Next meeting.

Benjamin Dickieson and Eliza Hamer Declared their intention of Marriage with each other the first - Sarah Daws and Jane Roberts are appointed to inspect into her clearness and conversation and bring report to the next Meeting.

Plymouth and Oley frds having made a thorough visitt gave an account thereof att this meeting which was very acceptable.
 
(Sarah Cox is my second cousin 7 times removed. David Potts is her first cousin once removed. Our common ancestors are Thomas Potts & Elizabeth Baset.)

1731 Maryland

Aug 28, 1731- John Hardy, with the consent of his wife Barbara, conveys to John Haswell 75 acres Brotherhood.

(John Hardy is my fifth great granduncle. Our common ancestors are William & Elizabeth Hardy.)


1731- Guy Elder is born to William Elder and Ann Wheeler at Good Will, Prince George's County, Maryland.

(Guy Elder is my first cousin 6 times removed.)

1732 Virginia

August 27, 1732- William Elder receives a patent for land in Frederick County, Virginia, from Lord Baltimore.


(William Elder is my fifth great granduncle. Our common ancestor is Elizabeth Finch.)

Saturday, January 23, 2010

1732 Maryland

1732- Solomon Hardy born to William Hardy and Ann Stimson in Prince George's County, Maryland.  Henry Hardy is born to George Hardy and Elizabeth Drane.

(Solomon Hardy is my 4th great grandfather. Solomon and Henry are first cousins. Henry Hardy is my 1st cousin 6 times removed. Our common ancestors are William & Elizabeth Hardy.)




Friday, January 22, 2010

The Last Will of James French

March 4, 1733- The Last Will of James French,

St. Marys County, Maryland

In the name of God, Amen, I, James French of St.Mary's County______ being weak in body but of sound mind & memory, blessed be God, do make this my last Will & Testament in form as follows:_____I give & bequeath unto my beloved grandson, John French, to him and his heirs forever, one hundred & ten acres of land to be laid out on the West side of my land & also on the west side of a Branch unto my well beloved grand child, Mary Leake, wife of John Leake, to her and the heirs of her body lawfully begotten
forever.
Item: My Will is that my good & trusty servant, James Kirby shall be free from servitude on the day of my death.
Item: My Will is after all my just debts are paid, all that remains of my personal Estate be equally divided amongst all my grandchildren.
Item: I constitute & appoint my said grandchild, John French, my whole & sole executor of this my last Will & Testament, in Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal on this fourth day of March, in the year of our Lord, 1733

James French (SEAL)

Signed, sealed & published to be his last Will & Testament in the presence of:

John Thompson
James Kail
Elizabeth French.

March 17, 1733

John Thompson and Elizabeth French, two of the subscribing witnesses to the foregoing Will, being duly & solemnly sworn on the Holy Evangelist of Almighty God, depose & say that they saw the testator, James French, sign the foregoing Will and heard him publish and declare the same to be his last Will & Testament that at the time of his doing so he was to the best of their apprehension of sound and disposing mind and memory and that they subscribed their respective names as witnesses to the said will in the presence of John French, grandson & heir at law, which same, John French did not object to the ____of the said Will.

Sworn to before me Tho. Aisquith, Deputy County Clerk of St. Mary's County.

(James French is my 8th great grandfather.)

Monday, January 18, 2010

1733 Maryland

June 3, 1733- William Hayden dies at the age of 58 in St. Mary's County, Maryland.

(William Hayden is my 6th great grandfather.)

1733- George, William and Ignatius Hardy listed as taxables in the Upper Piscataway Hundred.

(These Hardy brothers are my 5th great grand uncles. Our common ancestors are William and Elizabeth Hardy.)
 
1733- William Elder and his wife Ann Wheeler are living at Slate Ridge Farm, property owned by Arnold Livers. After Ann's death in 1739, William would go on to marry Arnold's daughter Jacoba in 1742.
 
Jacoba's brother Arnold was a Jesuit Priest. He had traveled to Watten, Holland to study for the priesthood. He entered the Society of Jesus on September 7, 1724 and was ordained. In 1733 he was assigned to the missions of Maryland. He returned to Maryland in 1734 and served at St. Thomas Manor, Newtown, and St. Inigoes, where he died August 16, 1767.

(Arnold Livers is my 5th great grandfather. William Elder is my fifth grand uncle.)

Gwynedd Meeting 1733

February 26, 1733- Quaker Meeting at Gwynedd, Pennsylvania

...at our Monthly Meeting held at Gwynedd the 26 of the 2 mo 1733:

Rowland Hugh and Ellin Robert Declared their intention of Marriage with each other the second time - Jane Lewis and Alice Griffith are desired to attend the Marriage and bring their account to the next Meeting.

Anthony Connard and Sarah Hatfield Declared their intention of Marriage with each other the second time - Jane Robert and Elizabeth Ellis are desired to attend the Marriage and bring their account to the Next Meeting.

(Anthony Connard and Sarah Hatfield are my 6th great grandparents.)

Moses Peters and Martha Thomas Declared their intention of Marriage with each other the second time - Jane Lewis and Jane Nailor are desired to attend the marriage and bring their account next Meeting.

William Spencer and Elizabeth Lewis Declared their intention of Marriage with each other the second time - Catherine William and Jane Lewis are desired to attend the Marriage and bring their report next Meeting.

John Jones and Gainor Humphrey Declared their intention of Marriage with each other the first time - Ann Roberts and Jane Jones are appointed to inspect into her clearness and Conversation and bring report to the next meeting.

John Griffith and Ann Jones Declared their intention of marriage with each other the first time - Anne Foulk and Mary Roberts are Desired to inspect into her Clearness and Conversation and bring report to the next Meeting.

The women friends appointed Last Meeting to attend the Last Marriage report it was orderly accomplished.

The several preparatives belonging to this Meeting having the weighty service of visiting families under consideration have for Gwynedd chose Alice Griffith, Gwen Morris, Anne Roberts, Ellin Evans - for Plymouth, Ellin Meredith and Rachel Potts - for the swamp, Ann Foulk and Catherine Ball - for Oley, Jane Ellis and Abigail Wiley.

(Anne Roberts is my 6th great grandmother, she would marry David Potts in 1737. Rachel Potts is the wife of Thomas, my 1st cousin eight times removed, and first cousin to David Potts.)

Jane Lewis and Margaret Humphrey are appointed to attend the Next Quarterly Meeting at Philadelphia.

Sunday, January 17, 2010

Randall Family in Minnesota



This photograph was sent to me by my distant cousin, Jerry Sanner of Hawaii. It belonged to the Randall family in Minnesota. Estella Lucinda Randall is my maternal great grandmother. Any help in identifying these people would be greatly appreciated.

Quaker Offense of "Disorderly Walking"



The phrase "disorderly walking" dates back to some of the earliest Quakers writing of the late 1600's. The concept is that a true member of the Society of Friends walks a path throughout their lives whose proper bounds are prescribed by the Discipline. If they follow this path they remain a member in good standing. The phrase "disorderly walking" implies straying from the path required by Discipline and places the member in imminent danger of disownment.
An epistle from a general meeting in June 1676 discusses the principle of collective discipline and the responsibility of each meeting to admonish its own members:

"God hath taught us to deny the Customs, Fashions, & Words of the World, which are evil, & to bear a Testimony against it...to stir up the pure mind in one another, that the Principles of the blessed Truth, be allways Stood in..."

It goes on to state the duty of each meeting to admonish its members for "disorderly walking," and lists these offences:

not to keep the form of sound words
or use or wear needless Attire
or to oppress or defraud any man in his dealings
Not endeavor to bring up Children in the fear of the Lord

The phrase "disorderly walking" was sometimes used to conceal the real nature of the offense to protect confidentiality, or deflect outside criticisms. Event violent offenses could be cloaked in this way.

Quaker Ancestors Group

1733 Pennsylvania

January 26, 1733- In 1732, Thomas Potts, Jr. had married Susanna. The marriage was accomplished in a manner ''contrary to Discipline of fray" and on January 26, 1733, they made an acknowledgment for their "Disorderly Walking," which the Quakers accepted. This shows that Susanna was also a Friend, but her maiden name is not given. They resided in Bristol Township.

(Thomas Potts, Jr. is my 1st cousin eight times removed. Our common ancestors are Thomas Potts and Elizabeth Baset. The Thomas Potts spoken of below is his first cousin. Jane Austin is his aunt.)
 
February 24, 1733- Anthony Conard marries Sarah Hatfield in Germantown, Pennsylvania. Daughter Margaret Conard is born later the same year.

(Anthony Conard is my sixth great grandfather.)

November 16, 1733- Thomas and Rachel Potts sell a tract of 140 acres to Thomas Lewis, a miller from Goshen, Chester County, Pennsylvania. The plantation, located in Roxbury, Roxborough Township, Philadelphia County, had been purchased from Isaac Norris back in 1726.

(Thomas Potts is my 1st cousin eight times removed. Our common ancestors are Thomas Potts and Elizabeth Baset.)

December 26, 1733- Jane Austin, being "weak in body but of sound mind and memory," made her will December 26, 1733, and died September 14, 1734. The will is recorded in Will-Book E, page 309, at Philadelphia. She mentions son Samuel Austin; daughters Ann Robins, Elizabeth Chanel and Mary; grand-children John Robins, Mary Robins, John Austin, John Wood.
The excutors were George Fitzwater, Anthony Morris and Jacob Shoemaker. Witnesses, Ezekiel Potts and John White.

(Jane Austin [nee Potts] is my 7th great grand aunt. Our common ancestors are Thomas Potts and Elizabeth Baset. The Thomas Potts mentioned above is her nephew.)

Saturday, January 16, 2010

1734 Maryland

1734- William Elder, a Catholic, emigrates from St. Mary's County, Maryland, to Frederick County, Maryland. He is the first white man to settle in the Emmitsburg district. William and his wife Ann first settle near Payne's Hill, between what later would become Mount St. Mary's and Thurmont. He is soon joined by his friend Arnold Livers.
He gives the name "St. Mary's Mount" to a portion of Carrick's Knob. He locates at the foot of Blue Ridge Mountains, the home of Indians and wild beasts.
He calls his place "Pleasant Level." While building his house, He reserves one room to serve as a chapel for religious services. This room is equal in size to all the rest of his house.

(Arnold Livers is my fifth great grandfather. William Elder is my fifth great grand uncle. Our common ancestor is Elizabeth Finch.)

1734- Benjamin Stimton, planter, Prince George County, 23rd Sept., 1734; 11th Nov,1734,
To wife [unnamed] and child, [unnamed], entire personal estate, divided equally.
To son Benjamin and heirs, 50 Acre dwelling plantation, "Solomon Purchase." Should any of children die during minority, survivors to divide portion of deceased.

Test: Solomon Stimton, Peter Hoggins, Thomas Elder
(Benjamin Stimton is my fifth great grand uncle. Our common ancestors are Solomon Stimton and Elizabeth Finch. He is William Elder's half-brother.)

December 10, 1734- John Drury marries Susannah Hayden in St. Mary's, Maryland.

(John Drury is my fifth great grandfather.)

Charles County Land Records, 1733-1743; Book O#2, Page 76. Recorded Dec 11, 1734.

I, Sarah Roby of Charles County, widow, for the natural love I have for my son, Peter Roby of Charles County, planter, I have given him 1 feather bed and furniture, 1 wooden cupboard, 1 wooden table, 1 iron pot, and all other my personal estate which is now in my possession. Signed Nov 30, 1734 - Sarah (H her mark) Roby. Witnesses - Henry Hawkins, Samuel Hawkins

(Sarah Roby (nee Luckett) is my sixth great grandmother.)

1734- Thomas Luckett dies in Charles County, Maryland.
Thomas Luckett died intestate, and in accordance with the customs of the times, letters of administration were issued to his widow Sarah Luckett. On August 14, 1734, William Middleton and William Hagan exhibited bond in court. His brothers, Ignatius Luckett and Thomas Hussey Luckett, as the kinsmen, certified on December 3, 1734, to the inventory appraised at L104/5/9, by James Middleton. By 1737 his widow had married William Semmes. ("The Lucketts of Portobacco" by Harry Wright Newman, 1938.)

(Thomas Luckett is my third cousin 7 times removed. Our common ancestors are John Hussey and Mary Wroth. Sarah Roby is his second cousin once removed.)

1734- Elizabeth Mockbee Nicholls dies in Prince George's County, Maryland.

(Elizabeth Mockbee Nicholls is my 6th great grandmother.)

Friday, January 15, 2010

1734 Pennsylvania

September 14, 1734- Jane Potts, wife of John Austin, dies in Philadephia, Pennsylvania.

Jane Austin, being "weak in body but sound mind and memory," made her will December 26, 1733, and died September 14, 1734. Her will is recorded in Will-Book E, page 309, at Philadelphia. She mentions son Samuel Austin; daughters Ann Robins, Elizabeth Chanel and Mary; grandchildren John Robbins, Mary Robins, John Austin, John Wood. The executors were George Fitzwater, Anthony Morris, and Jacob Shoemaker. Witnesses, Ezekiel Potts and John White.


Historical Collections Relating to The Potts Family in Great Britian and America, Published by the Compiler, Canonsburg, PA, 1901, Thomas Maxwell Potts, p.200.

(Jane Potts is my 7th great grand aunt. Our common ancestors are Thomas Potts and Elizabeth Baset.)

Sunday, January 10, 2010

Virginia Memory: This Day in Virginia History

This is a fun distraction, might even learn something.

Virginia Memory: This Day in Virginia History

Posted using ShareThis

1734 Virginia


1734- Quakers arrive in Loudoun County, Virginia, settling to the southward. This untamed wilderness was settled from two directions. From Virginia's Tidewater came farm managers, slaves, and indentured servants working for the aristocracy. They came to develop tobacco farms in the piedmont plain of Eastern Loudoun. From the Shenandoah Valley and from Pennsylvania came the Quakers, Germans, and Scots-Irish who wished to start small farms. They chose the west, near the mountains, in the Loudoun and Catoctin Valleys where the soil was good and the climate congenial. They also chose to grow their wheat without the help of slave labor.

Christiana Potts is born to David Potts and Elizabeth Jane Lane in Loudoun County, Virginia.

(Christiana Potts is my 5th great grand aunt.)

History and Comprehensive Description of Loudoun County, Virginia

Pedigree of David Potts



David Potts, a soldier of the American Revolution from Loudoun County, Virginia, and his sons, James Potts of Ross County, Ohio, David Potts, Jr. of Fairfield ... their descendants: Allied family of Gault

1735 Pennsylvania

1735- Ann Conard born to Anthony Conard and Sarah Hatfield in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

(Ann Conard is my 5th great grand aunt.)

1735- Reiner Theissen is appointed along with two other members of his monthly meeting "to visit families of Friends for the promotion of the religious concerns of the Society." This elder of the Abington Monthly Meeting was believed to have been a Mennonite in Germany, but converted to the Society of Friends before immigration to Pennsylvania.
According to William Penn and the Dutch Quakers, he was a man of large wealth and much influence, but is said to have never learned to write his name.

 (Reiner Theissen is my 8th great grand uncle. He is also the great grand uncle of Ann Conard. Our common ancestors are Mathias Dohrs and Agnes Neesgen Op Den Graeff.)

1735 Virginia

1735- David Potts, son of Jonas and Mary Potts, leaves Germantown, Pennsylvania, settling in Loudoun County, Virginia, in the area of Cabletown.

Saturday, January 9, 2010

Maryland- Catholic Historic Site


1735 Maryland

 1735- The Land records of Prince George's County, Maryland, 1733-1739 By Elise Greenup Jourdan:

Liber T Page 355

Recorded at request of James Russell, 21 Feb 1735:
Bill of Sale; James Powell of Upper Marlborough Town, innholder, ..., to James Russell, goods, chattels and debts, etc., 4 Feb 1735; /s/ Jas. Powell, wit. Thos. Clark, Will. Hardie

Liber T Page 315

Recorded at request of James Russell, 22 Sep 1735:
Indenture between Thomas Gray of Somerset Co. and James Russell, merchant;...a sloop registered as Betty of the burthen of 20 tons at anchor in the Pantuxent; also Negro man belonging to sd. sloop named Ishmael; etc.; /s/ Thomas Gray; wit. Will. Hardie, Hugh Taylor; ack. Thomas Gray

(William Hardy is my 5th great grandfather.)

November 26, 1735- John Magruder and his wife Susanna convey to Ignatius Hardy 100 acres, part of Casteal.

(Ignatius Hardy is my 5th great grand uncle. William Hardy is the brother of Ignatius Hardy. Our common ancestors are Elizabeth and William Hardy.)
 
1735- Mary Elder born to William Elder and Ann Wheeler in Frederick County, Maryland.
 
(Mary Elder and I are 1st cousins 6 times removed.)

Friday, January 8, 2010

1736- Ben Franklin, Fireman

The first volunteer fire company in America, "The Union Fire Company," was founded by Benjamin Franklin and four associates on December 7, 1736. Franklin served on it as America’s first volunteer fire chief.

It lasted for eighty-four years.

After an extensive fire in Philadelphia in 1736, Franklin created a fire brigade called The Union Fire company with 30 volunteers.
 So many men wanted to join Franklin's Union Company that he suggested it would be more beneficial to the salubrity of the city if they formed their own fire brigades. In the next several years, Philadelphians witnessed the birth of the Heart-in-Hand, the Britannia, the Fellowship, as well as several other fire companies.

In the 1884 book History of Philadelphia, 1609-1884, John Thomas Scharf and Thompson Westcott described the organization of the company:
The Union Fire Company was an association for mutual assistance. Each member agreed to furnish, at his own expense, six leather buckets and two stout linen bags, each marked with his name and the name of the company, which he was to bring to every fire. The buckets were for carrying water to extinguish the flames, and the bags were to receive and hold property which was in danger, to save it from risk of theft. The members pledged themselves to repair to any place in danger upon an alarm of fire with their apparatus. Some were to superintend the use of the water, others were to stand at the doors of houses in danger, and to protect the property from theft. On an alarm of fire at night it was agreed that lights should be placed in the windows of houses of members near the fire "in order to prevent confusion, and to enable their friends to give them more speedy and effectual assistance.'

According to Scharf and Westcott, the company was limited to 30 members who met eight times a year and were fined if they were late to or missed a meeting. The company had no president, but a treasurer and a clerk, take in turns from the general membership, who not only managed communications with other members but also inspected the gear.

With respect to the equipment, Scharf and Westcott note the following:

At this time engines and buckets were the only available apparatus, as pumps were few, and the supply of water scant. The engine of the Union Company, it is believed, was imported from England, as were also those of the other companies formed down to 1768.

The engine of the Union Company was probably kept in a house in Grindstone Alley, which runs north from Market Street to Church Alley, west of Second Street.

1736 Pennsylvania

January 17, 1736- Anthony Williams and Sarah Shoemaker are married at the Abington Friends' Meeting-house. They settle in Bristol Township, and have a family of eighteen children, many of
whom die in youth.

(Anthony Williams and I are 1st cousins 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are Aret Klincken and Niske Agnes Jensen.)

February 21, 1736- Eleanor Klincken, the mother of Anthony Williams, dies in Germantown, Pennsylvania.

(Eleanor Klincken is my 7th great grand aunt. Our common ancestors are Aret Klincken and Niske Agnes Jensen.)

The Settlement Of Germantown, Pennsylvania And The Beginning Of German Emigration To North America

Thursday, January 7, 2010

52 Weeks To Better Genealogy - Challenge #1

Amy Coffin of the fabulous We Tree blog has developed 52 Weeks To Better Genealogy: a series of weekly prompts that are geared towards those new to the field of genealogy and family history as well as those who want to brush up on some skills which might be a bit rusty.

I decided to attend this event through  the Genea-bloggers group on Facebook.

Week 1: Go to your local public library branch. Make a note of the genealogy books in the collection that may help you gain research knowledge. Don’t forget to check the shelves in both the non-fiction section and the reference section. If you do not already have a library card, take the time to get one. If you have a genealogy blog, write about what you find in your library’s genealogy collection.


Okay, here we go:
I loaded up my tote bag with my library card, a spiral notebook, pencil and pen. It was a lovely day here on the Central California Coast, and I decided to get a walk out of the deal.
Los Osos is a tiny little town, which is reflected in the size of its library.
The genealogy section contained six books, listed in order of age:

In Search of Your European Roots: A Complete Guide to Tracing Your Ancestors in Every Country in Europe by Angus Baxter (1985 edition)
On May 23, 2001, the Midwest Book Review of Oregon, Wisconsin had this to say:
"the premier guide for the novice genealogist seeking trace ancestors in any and every country throughout Europe. The location of each country's national and municipal archives is recorded, in addition to the location of church records, census returns, the system of civil registrations of births, marriages, and deaths, along with pertinent recommendations on finding and using such records as foundling books, orphans' lists, certificates of domicile, guild records, internal passports, confirmation records, and vaccination lists."
That might well be true, but England did not appear in the Table of Contents, so I left it on the shelf.

The Complete Beginner's Guide to Genealogy, the Internet, and Your Genealogy Computer Program by Karen Clifford (2001)
I didn't spend much time with this one, as the Internet of 2001 no longer exists.

The Genealogist's Question & Answer Book by Marcia Melnyk (2002)

Genealogy Online by Elizabeth Crowe (2003)
Five years ago on the Internet?

The Family Tree Problem Solver: Proven Methods for Scaling the Inevitable Brick Wall by Marsha Hoffman Rising (2005)
I checked this one out, immediately seeing topics of interest. "helps intermediate to advanced researchers break through these "brick walls" by breaking down each researcher's common problem into a chapter with straightforward solutions." I think I can learn a thing or two from this one.

Getting Started in Genealogy Online by William Dollarhide (2006)
This seems to be a list of websites for the beginning researcher, but it least the internet spoken of was recognizable.

Don't get me wrong, I love my library...they do a great job for this little town. And a while back, they told me about HeritageQuest Online, where you can search 26,000 books of local and family histories, search the Census and Persi. Your librarian can tell you how to access this invaluable resource.

Monday, January 4, 2010

1736 Maryland

1736- William Drury born to John Drury and Susannah Hayden in Maryland.

(William Drury is my 4th great grand uncle. Our common ancestors are John Drury and Susannah Hayden.)

Maryland, A Middle Temperament: 1634-1980 (Maryland Paperback Bookshelf)

Sunday, January 3, 2010

1737 Maryland

1737- Mary Brady born in Charles County, Maryland.

(Mary Brady is my 4th great grandmother. Mary Brady would marry John Worland III in 1773, becoming the daughter-in-law of John Worland who figures in the following court case.)

December 21, 1737- Charles County Court Records, March 1737/8 Court, Liber T#2, Page 422.
Pursuant to order of last November Charles County Court, Commission issued to examine witnesses touching the bounds of a tract of land called Dockers Delight, in possession of George Scroggin.

Commissioners appointed: Messrs Robert Yates, John Howard, Joseph Douglass, and John Maddox (not being any way related to the Petitions contiguous Proprietor, nor interested in the said land). Dockers Delight is in Charles County. The purpose of the Commission is to examine witnesses to prove and perpetuate the memory of the bounds of the said tract of land.

And now here, at March Court, Robert Yates and Joseph Douglas, return to this Court the Commission with the following depositions and certificate thereto annexed -
Charles County. The deposition of Edward Ford, age about 49, who says that George Thomas and he, being together, said Thomas showed him a bounded white oak standing on the head of a small branch near the house where said Ford now lives, which said Branch falls into the Head of Pickiawaxon Creek, and each of them then living on the said land, and since understands the said land was called Dockers Delight. Signed - Edward Ford.

The deposition of George Thomas, age about 65, who says that after he had bought part of that tract of land called Dockers Delight, that some of the old people then living (but who can't charge his memory with) told him that up a branch near some black haw trees stood a bounded white oak which, when this Deponent sought for, he found it according to description given, said branch falling into the head of Pickiawaxon Creek, & found that it should, in his judgment, be the 1st bound tree of said land. Signed - George Thomas.

The deposition of Edward Ford, age about 49, who says that the said Thomas brought him from the white oak in the above deposition, to a bounded poplar standing on the side of a branch and a fresh run that falls into the head of Pickiawaxon Creek, and further says that the said Thomas put his back against the said poplar and said he ran to a bounded white oak standing and a hill. Signed - Edward Ford.

The deposition of Geo:rge Thomas, age about 65, who says that after he had bought part of that tract of land called Dockers Delight, that some of the old people then living (but who can't charge his memory with) told him that on the side of a hill and near a fresh run, there stood a bounded poplar which, when this deponent looked for, found according to description given, the said fresh run falling into the head of Pickiawaxon Creek, and found that it should, in his judgment, be the 2nd bound tree of Dockers Delight. Signed - George Thomas.

The deposition of Richard Smith, age about 50, who says that he had several times seen a bounded white oak standing on a hill, but thought it to be a bound tree of Mr. John Courts'.

The deposition of John Worland, age about 50, who says that his father showed him a bounded gum standing on a branch near a fresh rum, the said run falling into the head of Pickiawaxon Creek, which said tree he told him was a bound tree of Dockers Delight. Signed - John (1W his mark) Woreland.

The further deposition of the said John Worland, age about 50, who says that his father showed him a bounded white oak standing in the woods near a small swamp and the land of Edward Ford, which tree is now cut down and stands a bounded locust post, and that his father further said it was a bound tree of Dockers Delight, which he had then in possession. Signed - John (1W his mark) Woreland.

The deposition of Edward Ford, age about 49, who says that George Thomas showed him a bounded white oak standing in the woods near a small swamp where now stands a bounded locust post, and said it was a bounded tree of the land they then lived on, and since has understood it to be the land called Dockers Delight. Signed - Edward Ford.

The deposition of William Jenkerson, age about 40, who says that George Thomas Sr told him that a white oak (now down) standing on a hill, which tree is now dead, to be a bound tree of the land that he had rented of George Thomas. Signed - William (I his mark) Jenkerson.

The deposition of George Thomas, age about 65, who says that on a small point of a hill and a branch on each side and fresh run, he found as aforementioned, a bounded white oak which he thought to be a bound tree of Dockers Delight. Signed - George Thomas.

We, being qualified before John Briscoe, have examined the witnesses brought to us this Dec 21, 1737. Signed - Robert Yates, Joseph Douglass.

(John Worland II is my 5th great grandfather.)

Colonial Records of Southern Maryland: Trinity Parish & Court Records, Charles County; Christ Church Parish & Marriage Records, Calvert County; St. Andrew¿s & All Faith¿s Parishes, St. Mary¿s County

Friday, January 1, 2010

1738 Pennsylvania

April 9, 1738- John Conard born to Anthony Cunard and Sarah Hatfield in Gwynedd, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.

(John Kunders Conard is my 5th great grandfather.)

April 11, 1738- David Potts born to David Potts and Ann Roberts in Germantown, Pennsylvania.

(David Potts is my 5th great grand uncle. His sister, Elizabeth, would marry John Conard in 1762.)

1738 Maryland

April 29, 1738- John Hardy sells 50 acres to Francis Montgomery. He had inherited 50 acres "Dividing Run" from his father, William Hardy.
November 4, 1738-  George Hardy and Joseph Noble appraise the inventory of Samuel Williams of Prince George's County, Maryland.

(George Hardy and John Hardy are my 5th great grand uncles.  John Hardy and George Hardy are brothers. Our common ancestors are William Hardy and his wife Elizabeth.)

1738- Ann Stimson, wife of William Hardy, dies in Prince George's County, Maryland.
 
(Ann Stimson is my 5th great grandmother.)

Virginia Gazette- January 1739

An advertisement from a January 1739 issue of the Virginia Gazette:

On the 30th of December last, a fat hog, hamstrung, and suppos'd to be lost out of a Drove, was found at a Plantation of mine, near Barret's Ferry, on Chickahominy; which, for the Owner's Benefit, I caus'd to be killed, and weigh'd, and the Ears preserv'd. The Owner upon describing  the Ear-mark, and proving his Property of the said Hog, and paying for this Advertisement, shall have ample Satisfaction made him, at the Market Price, by
                              Henry Power

1739 Virginia

1739- Christian Miller born in Virginia.

(Christian Miller is my 5th great grandfather.)