The Worland Family in America and Beyond

I began my life in the Puget Sound area of Washington State, on an island filled with forests and wild rhododendrons. I was separated from my Worland family there at an early age. Recently, I was reunited with my family and learned of my heritage. And so, this journey to know my ancestors began. The Worlands, Gideons, Newtons, Conards... they were the colonists, the settlers, the pioneers. They fought in the American Revolution, the War of 1812, the Civil War. This is their story, and the story of a nation. -Deci Worland MacKinnon

Sunday, January 3, 2010

1737 Maryland

1737- Mary Brady born in Charles County, Maryland.

(Mary Brady is my 4th great grandmother. Mary Brady would marry John Worland III in 1773, becoming the daughter-in-law of John Worland who figures in the following court case.)

December 21, 1737- Charles County Court Records, March 1737/8 Court, Liber T#2, Page 422.
Pursuant to order of last November Charles County Court, Commission issued to examine witnesses touching the bounds of a tract of land called Dockers Delight, in possession of George Scroggin.

Commissioners appointed: Messrs Robert Yates, John Howard, Joseph Douglass, and John Maddox (not being any way related to the Petitions contiguous Proprietor, nor interested in the said land). Dockers Delight is in Charles County. The purpose of the Commission is to examine witnesses to prove and perpetuate the memory of the bounds of the said tract of land.

And now here, at March Court, Robert Yates and Joseph Douglas, return to this Court the Commission with the following depositions and certificate thereto annexed -
Charles County. The deposition of Edward Ford, age about 49, who says that George Thomas and he, being together, said Thomas showed him a bounded white oak standing on the head of a small branch near the house where said Ford now lives, which said Branch falls into the Head of Pickiawaxon Creek, and each of them then living on the said land, and since understands the said land was called Dockers Delight. Signed - Edward Ford.

The deposition of George Thomas, age about 65, who says that after he had bought part of that tract of land called Dockers Delight, that some of the old people then living (but who can't charge his memory with) told him that up a branch near some black haw trees stood a bounded white oak which, when this Deponent sought for, he found it according to description given, said branch falling into the head of Pickiawaxon Creek, & found that it should, in his judgment, be the 1st bound tree of said land. Signed - George Thomas.

The deposition of Edward Ford, age about 49, who says that the said Thomas brought him from the white oak in the above deposition, to a bounded poplar standing on the side of a branch and a fresh run that falls into the head of Pickiawaxon Creek, and further says that the said Thomas put his back against the said poplar and said he ran to a bounded white oak standing and a hill. Signed - Edward Ford.

The deposition of Geo:rge Thomas, age about 65, who says that after he had bought part of that tract of land called Dockers Delight, that some of the old people then living (but who can't charge his memory with) told him that on the side of a hill and near a fresh run, there stood a bounded poplar which, when this deponent looked for, found according to description given, the said fresh run falling into the head of Pickiawaxon Creek, and found that it should, in his judgment, be the 2nd bound tree of Dockers Delight. Signed - George Thomas.

The deposition of Richard Smith, age about 50, who says that he had several times seen a bounded white oak standing on a hill, but thought it to be a bound tree of Mr. John Courts'.

The deposition of John Worland, age about 50, who says that his father showed him a bounded gum standing on a branch near a fresh rum, the said run falling into the head of Pickiawaxon Creek, which said tree he told him was a bound tree of Dockers Delight. Signed - John (1W his mark) Woreland.

The further deposition of the said John Worland, age about 50, who says that his father showed him a bounded white oak standing in the woods near a small swamp and the land of Edward Ford, which tree is now cut down and stands a bounded locust post, and that his father further said it was a bound tree of Dockers Delight, which he had then in possession. Signed - John (1W his mark) Woreland.

The deposition of Edward Ford, age about 49, who says that George Thomas showed him a bounded white oak standing in the woods near a small swamp where now stands a bounded locust post, and said it was a bounded tree of the land they then lived on, and since has understood it to be the land called Dockers Delight. Signed - Edward Ford.

The deposition of William Jenkerson, age about 40, who says that George Thomas Sr told him that a white oak (now down) standing on a hill, which tree is now dead, to be a bound tree of the land that he had rented of George Thomas. Signed - William (I his mark) Jenkerson.

The deposition of George Thomas, age about 65, who says that on a small point of a hill and a branch on each side and fresh run, he found as aforementioned, a bounded white oak which he thought to be a bound tree of Dockers Delight. Signed - George Thomas.

We, being qualified before John Briscoe, have examined the witnesses brought to us this Dec 21, 1737. Signed - Robert Yates, Joseph Douglass.

(John Worland II is my 5th great grandfather.)

Colonial Records of Southern Maryland: Trinity Parish & Court Records, Charles County; Christ Church Parish & Marriage Records, Calvert County; St. Andrew¿s & All Faith¿s Parishes, St. Mary¿s County

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