The Worland Family in America and Beyond

I began my life in the Puget Sound area of Washington State, on an island filled with forests and wild rhododendrons. I was separated from my Worland family there at an early age. Recently, I was reunited with my family and learned of my heritage. And so, this journey to know my ancestors began. The Worlands, Gideons, Newtons, Conards... they were the colonists, the settlers, the pioneers. They fought in the American Revolution, the War of 1812, the Civil War. This is their story, and the story of a nation. -Deci Worland MacKinnon

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Who Are They?


I found these in an older sewing book at the local thrift store here in Los Osos, California. It pains me to see folks lose great pictures like these. If you know who they are and would like these pictures, please leave a comment below or contact me through my profile.

August 1722, Pennsylvania

Graeme Park was originally called "Fountain Low" by Sir Keith.

August 27, 1722- John Kirk and Sarah Tyson are married in at the Abington Monthly Meeting in Germantown, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.

"Whereas John Kirk & Sarah Tyson having Declared their Intentions of Marraige with each other before two Mo. Meetings Enquirey being Made by Persons Appointed & found clear from all others on ye Acct of Marraige are Left to Accomplish ye same Orderly." (Swarthmore - Abington MM)


John Kirk was a stone-mason, (today he'd be called 'building contractor'), and built the house known as the Kirk Homestead (still standing) in which he and his descendants lived for many years. He also worked on, in 1722, Graeme Park, the mansion of Pennsylvania's first Governor Keith, which has recently been restored and is a Pennsylvania Historical Site.
The official Graeme House booklet notes John Kirk as having built the house, however, further research - and the initials "M.T." on the house - indicate that John Kirk most likely was not the building's mason, but rather it was Matthias Tyson, John's brother-in-law. John Kirk probably built the brewery elsewhere on the property, but no longer extant.
"Know all Men by these presents that I Sir William Keith Baronet Governor of the Province of Pennsylvania am held and firmly bound unto John Kirk of the County of Philadelphia Mason in the Summ of One Hundred Pounds good and lawful Money of America to be paid to the said John Kirk his certain Attorney Executors Administrators or Assigns; To the which Payment well and truly to be made I bind myself my Heirs Executors and Administrators firmly by these presents. Sealed with my seal. Dated the Twelfth Day of December in the Eighth year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord King George Anne Domini 1721." (The original is in the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.)


The Kirk homestead, painted circa 1830 by Robert Street, who traveled through the Philadelphia area doing portraits and farm landscapes in oil in exchange for room and board. In this way he made his living. The Kirk house is still standing on Fitzwatertown Road near Willow Grove, Pennsylvania, although the barns and outbuildings have been demolished. Today it is surrounded by a development of new homes which come within a few feet of the house itself.

(Sarah Tyson is my first cousin 9 times removed. Our common ancestors are Mathias Dohrs and Agnes Neesgen Op den Graeff.)

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

June 1722, Connecticut

June 5, 1722- Richard Turner is born to Richard Turner & Hannah Bidwell in Middletown, Middlesex, Connecticut.

Samuel Whitmore and Hannah Hubbard are married in Middletown, Middlesex County, Connecticut.

(Samuel Whitmore and Hannah Hubbard are my seventh great grandparents.
Richard Turner is my first cousin 9 times removed. Our common ancestors are Edward Turner & Mary Sanford.)

May 1722, Massachutsetts

May 7, 1722- William Sanford and Rebecca Howland are married in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachutsetts.

(William Sanford is my first cousin 9 times removed. Our common ancestors are George Sisson & Sarah Lawton.)

Monday, June 28, 2010

April 1722, Rhode Island

April 22, 1722- Mary Sisson is born to John Sisson & Rebecca Lawton in Tiverton, Newport County, Rhode Island.

(Mary Sisson is my seventh great grandaunt.)

April 1722, Maryland

April 1722- Henry Hardy is born to William Hardy & Ann Stimson in St. John's Parish, Prince George's County, Maryland.

April 4, 1722- William Hardy is born to George Hardy & Elizabeth Drane in Prince George's County, Maryland.

(Henry Hardy is my fourth great granduncle. Henry and William are first cousins.
William Hardy is my first cousin 6 times removed. Our common ancestors are William Hardy & Elizabeth Hayden.)

Sunday, June 27, 2010

March 1722, Pennsylvania

March 12, 1722- Martha Tyson is born to Matthias Tyson & Mary Potts in Abington Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.

(Martha Tyson is my second cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are Mathias Dohrs & Agnes Neesgen Op den Graeff and Coentgen Lenssen Coenis & Anna Entgen Thones.)

Saturday, June 26, 2010

1722 Massachutsetts

1722 - John Sisson, my eighth great grandfather, is jailed in Bristol, Massachutsetts, for refusing to pay taxes.

John Akin and Phillip Tabor, of Dartmouth, Joseph Anthony and John Sisson of Tiverton were assessors to their respective towns; and being Quakers and Baptists they refused to collect taxes imposed by the General Court Of Massachusetts for the maintenance of ministers.

This order was from the general court in Boston who had authority as of the 1692 charter.
For this they were all imprisoned at the common jail at new Bristol. The case was successfully argued before the King's Privy Council and it was decreed that not only must the officials be released but also that the taxes must be remitted.
This was a very important step for the Quakers because it marked the end of the persecution that had followed them for so long.

From The History of Bristol County, Massachusetts: With Biographical Sketches of Many of Its Pioneers and Prominent Men, Part 1

In the year 1722 the Assembly of Massachusetts passed an act to raise one hundred pounds in the town of Dartmouth and seventy-two pounds eleven shillings in the town of Tiverton (then a part of Massachusetts) for the support of ministers, whose selection was subject to the approval of the General Court. These two towns were the only ones in the Province that had not received any Presbyterian ministers. To blind the eyes of the people this sum was put with the province tax, and was afterwards to be drawn out of the treasury. The spirit with which this was met by the inhabitants of Dartmouth can best be seen by quoting the record of the town-meeting held Nov. 26, 1722. The record says,—


" It being put to vote whether the whole rate of one hundred and eighty-one pounds twelve shilllings, called Dartmouth's proportion of our province tax, he made by the selectmen, it passed in the negative. And It was put to vote whether eighty-'.ne pounds twelve shillings, being as we are informed by our representative to be our just proportion of our province tax, he forthwith ... by the selectmen of said Dartmouth. Voted that it shall be made. Thirdly, Voted that the charge, ..., either by execution on their bodies or estates or in appealing to His Majesty for relief, be raised by town rates. Fourthly, Voted that seven hundred pounds be used by the inhabitants of said Dartmouth by a town rate, for securing the selectmen for not making the into of one hundred pounds, and also for all expenses arising In our sending to England to His Majesty in the above premises. Fifthly, Voted that the selectmen are to be allowed — shillings, each of them, a day for every day they lie in jail on the town account."

The town was thoroughly in earnest. Only five tax-payers protested against this appropriation of the seven hundred pounds. This sum, large for those days, was to be met by the tax of that year, and was not bequeathed to posterity in the form of a town debt. Prior to this, in 1696, the town had instructed the selectmen not to make the rates sent for by the general treasurer for this purpose, and in the same year it was voted that Recompeuce Kirby and Mark Jenne should have fifty shillings apiece, part of the money they paid to Capt. Pope, upon the account of their being " pressed;" and it was also voted that there should be a rate made of twenty-four pounds for a town fund.

The bold and defiant attitude taken by the town could not be overlooked by the province rulers. The refusal of the selectmen to assess the tax was followed by their imprisonment in Bristol jail, where they remained about eighteen months. The persons who were imprisoned were Philip Taber and John Akin, selectmen of Dartmouth, and Joseph Anthony and John Sisson, selectmen of Tiverton, a part of whom were Baptists and a part Quakers. An embassy was sent to England. Thomas Richardson and Richard Partridge, who were Quakers, interceded in their behalf. Their petition, addressed to the King in Council, was an able document, and nobly did it plead for freedom of conscience and security of religion, civil liberty, and property. The petition was considered at the court of St. James on the 2d day of June, 1724, when were present the King's most Excellent Majesty and all the lords of the Privy Council, and it was ordered that the obnoxious taxes be remitted, and that Philip Taber and his fellow-sufferers be immediately released from their imprisonment, and the Governor and all other oflicers of the province of Massachusetts Bay were notified to yield obedience to these orders.

This brief but brilliant record of the sacrifices and sufferings, the persistent fidelity and the triumphant success of the humble fathers of the old town of Dartmouth in the great struggle for the rights of conscience, which is still going on throughout the Christian world, entitles them to a high place in the veneration and gratitude of their posterity. They share, with Roger Williams, the exalted honor of declaring to their rulers and to the world that, having fled from ecclesiastical oppression in the Old World, they would resolutely maintain their resistance to it in the New; and that through the confiscation of their goods, the incarceration of their persons, amidst all the hardships of a new settlement in the wilderness, and under all the horrors of savage warfare, they would never falter in the assertion and maintenance of the great principle of "perfect liberty in all matters of religious concernment."

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

1722 Pennsylvania

1722- James Conard is born to Cunraed Cunraeds & Ann Burson in Germantown, Pennsylvania.

Sarah Lukens is born to William Lukens & Elizabeth Tyson in Germantown, Pennsylvania.

(James Conard is my sixth great granduncle. James Conard and Sarah Lucken are second cousins. Their common ancestors are Coentgen Lenssen Coenis & Anna Entgen Thones.
Sarah Lukens is my second cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are Mathias Dohrs & Agnes Neesgen Op den Graeff.)

Monday, June 21, 2010

1722 Maryland

1722- Eleanor Heard is born to William Heard & Elizabeth Cole in St. Mary's County, Maryland.

John Medley and Elizabeth Meekin are married in St. Mary's, Maryland.

George Medley marries Anne Tant in St. Mary's, Maryland.

(Eleanor Heard is my second cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are Robert Cole & Rebecca Gill.
Elizabeth Meekin is my first cousin 9 times removed. Our common ancestors are William Meekin & Elizabeth Beard.
Anne Tant is my second cousin 7 times removed. Our common ancestor is Robert Drury. John Medley and George Medley are brothers.)

Sunday, June 20, 2010

December 1721, Pennsylvania

December 25, 1721- Daniel Potts and Sarah Shoemaker are married at the Abington Monthly Meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

(Daniel Potts is my first cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are Thomas Potts & Elizabeth Baset.
Sarah Shoemaker is my third cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are Hermann Op den Graeff & Gretjen Driessen Pletjes.) 

Saturday, June 19, 2010

October 1721, Pennsylvania

October 10, 1721- Abraham Tyson & Mary Hallowell are married in Germantown, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.
They had received permission of the Abington Monthly Meeting to marry on August 30, 1721, and the marriage was reported accomplished at the meeting of October 27, 1721. She was the daughter of Thomas and Rosamond Hallowell of Abington township, and granddaughter of John and Mary Hallowell, the progenitors of the family, who in 1683 had came from Hucknow parish of Sutton, Nottinghamshire, England, to Darby township, Chester county, Pennsylvania. The family later moved to Abington township, Philadelphia county.

(Abraham Tyson is my first cousin 9 times removed. Our common ancestors are Mathias Dohrs & Agnes Neesgen Op den Graeff.)

September 1721, Massachusetts

September 20, 1721- Elizabeth Mosher is born to Jonathan Mosher & Isabel Potter in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts.

(Elizabeth Mosher is my third cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are Thomas Lawton & Elizabeth Salisbury.)

Friday, June 18, 2010

July 1721, Pennsylvania

July 24, 1721- Rynear Tyson is born to John Tyson & Priscilla Naylor in Abington, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.

(Rynear Tyson is my second cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are Mathias Dohrs & Agnes Neesgen Op den Graeff and Coentgen Lennsen Coenis & Anna Entgen Thones.)

May 1721, Pennsylvania

May 25, 1721- Sarah Ambler is born to Joseph Ambler & Ann Williams in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.
(Sarah Ambler is my second cousin 7 times removed. Our common ancestors are Aret Klincken & Niske Agnes Jensen.)

Thursday, June 17, 2010

April 1721, Maryland

April 21, 1721- James Thompson has died in St. Mary's County, Maryland.

Will of James Thompson,  St Mary's County, 10th Feb., 1720/21;  21st Apr., 1721.

To son John and to Eliza, (wife of John Griggs), 1s. each, in full of their share of estate.
To son James, ex., interest in dwelling plantation --- and with dau. Sarah, residuary legatee of estate.
To divide same when son James arrives at age of 21.
Wm. Harrise guardian to sd. son.
Test: Wm. Johnson, Eliz. Fisher, Charles Lynch.
===
James Thompson 6.134 SM £65.2.0 Jun 22 ---- Sep 25 1721
Servants mentioned: Charles Smith (boy), Henry Starks (boy).
Appraisers: William Johnson, William Jones.
Creditors: Joseph Delaux, Vitus Herbert.
Next of kin: John Thompson, Elisabeth Griggs.
Executor: James Thompson, Jr.


(James Thompson is my sixth great granduncle. Our common ancestors are Robert Thompson & Mary French.)

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

February 1721, Pennsylvania

February 9, 1721- Mary Ann Burson is born to Joseph Burson & Mary Rachel Potts at Gilbert's Manor in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.

February 24, 1721- Matthias Lukens marries Ann Johnson at the Abington Monthly Meeting in Pennsylvania.

(Mary Ann Burson is my first cousin 7 times removed. Our common ancestors are Jonas Potts & Mary Thomaston.
Matthias Lukens is my first cousin 9 times removed. Our common ancestors are Mathias Dohrs & Agnes Neesgen Op den Graeff.)

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

February 1721, Maryland

February 9, 1721- William Hardy is born to William Hardy & Ann Stimson in St. John's Parish, Prince George's County, Maryland.

(William Hardy is my fourth great granduncle.)

Monday, June 14, 2010

1721 Connecticut

1721- Elizabeth Turner is born to John Turner & Susannah Merrill in Hartford, Connecticut.

Abigail Leaming is born to Jeremiah Leaming & Abigail Turner in Middlesex, Connecticut. This child would die before her fourth birthday.

(Elizabeth Turner is my first cousin 9 times removed. Her first cousin Abigail Leaming is my first cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are Edward Turner & Mary Sanford.)

Sunday, June 13, 2010

1721 Pennsylvania

1721- Henry Streypers is born to Lenart Streypers & Ann Entgen Cunraeds in Germantown, Pennsylvania.

William Levering is born to Jacob Levering & Alice Tunes in Roxborough, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.

Margaret DeHaven is born to Herman DeHaven & Anneken Op den Graeff in Germantown, Pennsylvania.

(Henry Streypers is my first cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are Thones Kunders & Elin Theisson.
William Levering is my second cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestor is Thonis Klincken.
Margaret DeHaven is my third cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are Hermann Op den Graeff & Gretjen Driessen Pletjes.)

Saturday, June 12, 2010

1721 Maryland

Decade rosary found at the archealogical dig at St. Mary's City, Maryland.
Blue glass and copper alloy.

1721- Richard Hayden is born to William Hayden & Elizabeth Thompson, daughter of Robert Thompson & Mary French, at Small Hopes, St. Mary's County, Maryland.

Elizabeth Thompson is born to Thomas Thompson & Jane Tant in Charles County, Maryland.

John Mills and Mary Manning are married in St. Mary's County, Maryland.

Cornelius Manning dies in St. Mary's County, Maryland.

The Last Will of Cornelis Manning

In the name of God Amen. I Cornelius Manning of St. Mary's County being sick of body but of sound & perfect memory thanks be to god do make & ordaine this my last will & Testament in form following.
First I give unto my loving wife the plantation I now live on commonly called Hattons, during her natural life provided that my said wife shall abide & live hereupon during her life, and if my said wife should leave the said plantation and leave also where that then it shall be in the power of John Mills my other executor to take the said plantation unto his _____ ______ & Keep the the same and the houses in tenent able repair until my son Cornelius Manning shall arive to age and then the said plantation & tract of land thereunto belonging I give and bequeath unto my said son Cornelius Manning all the plantation in porke hall neck whereon Henry Nowell lately lived and now possed by Doctor Johnson according to the meets and bonds that Henry Nowell held to him the said Cornelius Manning his heirs and assignes forever.
I give and bequeath unto my son Cornelius Manning all that plantation and tract of lane in Smiths Neck called Mannings Hold together with a tract of land thereunto adjoyning to Calverts Creek bought of George Parker to him the said Cornelius and to the heirs of his body lawfully begotten and for want of such heirs to his sister and to the survivour of them & to their heirs and asignes of the survivour of them forever.
I give & bequeath unto my two daughters Mary Mills and Ann Manning the remaining part of Porke Hall Neck to be equally devided between them the said Mary and Ann their & either of their heirs & assignes forever. And my true intent & meaning is that if eaither of my foresaid daughters should die without issue of their bodys that then the surviving daughter & her heirs shall take place and enjoy the remaining part of porke hall neck to the said survivour and their heirs & assignes forever.
I give and bequeath unto John Manning son of John Manning dec'd all that plantation called the rigg on Cornelius Swamp & to the heirs of his body lawfully begotton and for want of such heirs then to the heirs of me the said Cornelius Manning & to their heirs & assignes forever.
I give to William Morgan son to Edward Morgan one three years old heifer and as to my personal Estate after debts and changes payd I leave to be equally devided in three parts, one part thereof to my wife & the other two parts to be equally devided amongst my three children Cornelius, Mary and Ann.
I leave my son Cornelius under the care & government of John Mills untill he arrives to twenty one years of age.
I leave my daughter Ann under the care & Government of her Grandmother Shirly if she will take that care upon her if not to my sister Mills until she arrives to the age of sixteen years or day of marriage which shall first happen.
I give unto Mr. George Thurold my horse a fidler. & I do hereby constitute & Appoint my loving wife Elizabeth and John Mills to be joynt Executors of this my last will & testament, witness my hand and seale this tenth day of April 1721.
Cornelius Manning seal.
signed sealed and delivered August 15th 1721. in presence of Archibald Johnson, Mary Johnson, Rudolph Man, William Johnson.
Then came Mary Johnstone subscribing evidences to the within will & made oath upon the holy evangelist of Almighty God that they saw the testator sign & seal the within instrument as his last will & testament and that he published and declared the same so to be , and that at the time of his so doing he was of sound & perfect mind & memory to the best of their knowledge
August 21st 1721 sworn to before me John Baker Deputy Commissioner
then came Rodham subscibing evidence to the within will & made oath upon the holy evangelist of Almighty God theat they saw the testator sign & seal the same so to be & that at the time of his so doing he wass of sound & perfect mind & memory to the best their knowledge.
Sworne to before __ John Baker Deputy Commissioner

(Richard Hayden is my eighth great granduncle. Our common ancestor is William Hayden.
Elizabeth Thompson is my second cousin 7 times removed.  Elizabeth Thompson and Mary Manning are first cousins. Mary Manning is my third cousin 6 times removed. Cornelius is Mary's father. Cornelius Manning is my second cousin 7 times removed. He is first cousin to Elizabeth Thompson. Our common ancestor is Robert Drury.)

1720 Rhode Island

1720- Rebecca Randall is born to William Randall and Abial Wight in Rhode Island.

(Rebecca Randall is my first cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are William Randall & Rebecca Fowler.)

Friday, June 11, 2010

October 1720, Pennsylvania

Going to Meeting (at Abington) in a Settled Frost

October 21, 1720- John Tyson and Priscilla Naylor are married in Germantown, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. The Abington Monthly Meeting had granted the permission on August 31, 1720.
Priscilla was a daughter of Robert and Elizabeth Naylor, who in 1683 had came from Monyash, County Derby, England, and took up a tract of land on the stream now called Naylor's Run, in that part of Darby township, Chester county, which afterwards became Upper Darby township, Delaware county.

(John Tyson is my first cousin 9 times removed. Our common ancestors are Mathias Dohrs & Agnes Neesgen Op den Graeff.)

Colonial Families of Philadelphia

 by John W. Jordan

Thursday, June 10, 2010

August 1720, Rhode Island

August 30, 1720- Abigail Sisson, widow of William Tew and daughter of George Sisson & Sarah Lawton, dies at the age of 35 in Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island.
She had a sad life, full of tragedy and loss. In 1718, her husband had died, along with her father-in-law and two of her young children.  I suspect this was due to the plague which raged through Europe in the years 1718-1720. Another son would die in 1723, leaving only daughters Dorcas and Sarah to survive into adulthood. Apparently, Dorcas was disabled, and Sarah went on to marry Caleb Arnold.

The following documents provide some insight into that terrible time:

Document dated November 12, 1731-
Acct. of Richard Tew, George Sisson & William Sanford, Executors of Estate of William Tew of Tiverton, 'who Dyed 5th 2 mo,' ... Mentions payments to 'Henery Tew Guardian to Sarah and Dorcas Tew,' & 'To the widdow Abigail Tew.' Includes item 'To the funeral Expenses of Two Children Abigail & Edward Tew who Dyed ye 11th & 22d of August 1718.' Payment for 'Time and Trouble Expended in Removing ye familey of Said Tew from Tiverton to Portsmouth.' Payment 'To Scholing Sarah Tew and William Tew 10 weeks.' Item 'then Received under my Care Dorcas & Sarah Tew by the Request of their mother who Departed This Life the 30 pf the Sixth month 1720.' Various items for tending for Abigail Tew in her sickness and paying for her funeral. An item to 'Richard Tew in money to pay his Sister Peckom.' An item to 'Anna the wife of Henery Tew for the Grave Stones for William Tew his Wife and Three Children.' Mentions "Sarah Tew Left my house to Live with her aunt Wrightington.' Item 'To the abode of Dorcas Tew from the thirteenth of September 1723 until the thirteenth of September 1731' 



Rcpt. by Caleb Arnold of Newport and Sarah Arnold Lately Named Sarah Tew, for legacy from Est. of her father William Tew of Tiverton, as paid by Richard Tew, George Sisson & William Sanford, Execs, dtd. at Newport 7 March 1732/3. Also incl. 'all Satisfaction for the personal Estate of Abigail Tew widdow of the said Wllm Tew,' excepting for that portion reserved to support Dorcas Tew, dau. of said William Tew and an idiot.

(Abigail Sisson is my eighth great grandaunt.)

August 1720, Maryland

August 8, 1720- William Hardy, first child of George Hardy & Elizabeth Drane, is born in St. Mary's County, Maryland. The infant dies three days later on August 11.

(William Hardy is my first cousin 6 times removed.)

Wednesday, June 9, 2010

August 1720, Pennsylvania

Engraving of the Merion Friends Meetinghouse from The Welsh Settlement in Pennsylvania  by Charles H Browning (1912).

August 7, 1720- Jonathan Cox is born to Richard Cox & Margaret Potts in Kennet Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania.

 Joseph Ambler and Ann Williams are married at the Merion Friends Meeting House in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.

From our Monthly Meeting held at Gwynedd, the 20th day of ye Sixth month, 1720:
To the Monthly Meeting of Haverford, Greeting. Whereas the bearer hereof Joseph Ambler signified to us his intentions of Marriage with Ann Williams, one belonging to your meeting, requesting a few lines from us, now these may certify that a due enquiry hath been made, and we do not find while he lived amongst us, but his conversation have been sober and orderly, and as far as we know it he is clear from all other woman upon ye acct of marriage, so desireing his prosperity we remain your friends and brethren in the Truch.
Signed in Behalf of our sd meeting by.. Thomas Evan, Robert Evan, Robert Jones, John Hugh, Abraham Dawes and John Humphrey.

(Jonathan Cox is my second cousin 7 times removed. Our common ancestors are Thomas Potts & Elizabeth Baset.
Ann Williams is my first cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are Aret Klincken & Niske Agnes Jensen.)

Tuesday, June 8, 2010

June 1720, Belgium

June 23, 1720- William Penn, sixth son of Pennsylvania founder William Penn & Gulielma Maria Springett, dies at the age of 46, two years after the death of his father.
Young William had eventually left the Society of Friends. He visited Pennsylvania once, in 1704, where his high living greatly disturbed his father. On his death-bed he is said to have declared that he regretted the wrongs he had done.
As a marriage settlement, William Penn, Sr. had made over to young William the Irish estate of Shanagarry in Cork, entailing it on his male heirs. In 1666, the estate reputedly was worth £1000 a year. On his mother's death in 1694, Warminghurst in Sussex had become his by inheritance from her, and on young William's marriage, he and his wife appear to have taken up residence there, his father and stepmother moving to Bristol.

William came to Philadelphia without his wife, arriving in February 1704, with John Evans, who had been commissioned Lieutenant Governor by the Founder. His stay was not a success and was brief. After disposing of some of the Pennsylvania land given him by his father, he was back in England by mid-January, 1705. He and his wife lived at Warminghurst until it was sold in 1707, then apparently rented properties until his father's death in 1718. He unsuccessfully sought a political career in seeking a seat in Parliament, and appears to have left the upbringing and expenses of his children to his stepmother. In 1719, following the death of his father, he made an unsuccessful attempt to get the Pennsylvania Assembly to acknowledge his claim as chief Proprietor and heir-at-law. Irresponsible and unstable, he died in LiĆ©ge, Belgium in 1720, of consumption.

Earlier the same year, on February 14, 1720, his daughter Gulielma Maria Penn had married first husband Aubrey Thomas at St. Mary Magdalen Church, on Fish Street, in London.

(William Penn is my third cousin 9 times removed. Gulielma Maria Penn is my fourth cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are Pletjes Driessen & Alet Gobels Syllys.)

Monday, June 7, 2010

June 1720, Maryland


Sewing notions found during the archealogical excavation of St. Mary's City, Maryland. Implements such as these were likely used by Elizabeth Beard in her daily life.

June 1720- Elizabeth Beard, wife of James Meekin, has died in St. Mary's County, Maryland.

(Elizabeth Beard is my ninth great grandaunt. Our common ancestors are Alice & Robert Beard.)

Sunday, June 6, 2010

May 1720, Pennsylvania

May 5, 1720- John Lukens is born to Peter Lukens and Gaynor Evans in Germantown, Pennsylvania.

(John Lukens is my second cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are Mathias Dohrs & Agnes Neesgen Op den Graeff.)

April 1720, Maryland

Typical old manor house in Southern Maryland, built before 1720, since demolished.

1720- Robert Cole, husband of Elizabeth Tant, has died at the age of 34 at St. Clement's Manor in St. Mary's County, Maryland.

Will of Robert Cole
 St Mary's Co., 3rd Mar 1719-20; Apr., 1720.

To son John and hrs., dwelling plantation; personalty.
To son Robert and hrs., "Cole's Purchase," at head of Choptank Bay; personalty.
To dau. Mary and hrs., "Pearewales"; personalty.
To wife Eliza., personalty, and with child. residue of estate, equally.

Exs.: Wife Eliza and Bro. Edward.

Test: George Jenkens, Cuthbert Sawell (Seawell, Sewell) and Vitus Herbert
 
(Robert Cole is my first cousin 9 times removed. Our common ancestors are Robert Cole & Rebecca Gill.)

Saturday, June 5, 2010

April 1720, Rhode Island

April 14, 1720- William Randall, son of William and Abiah Randall, marries Mercy Williams in Providence, Rhode Island. Mercy is the daughter of Joseph and Lydia Hearnden Williams, and great granddaughter of Roger Williams, founder of Rhode Island at Providence.
William and Mercy Randall would have four children.

"Randall and Allied Families: William Randall of Scituate and His Descendants" by Frank Alfred Randall; pp. 40 and 48; Revert-WeberPrinting Company; Chicago, Illinois; 1943
 
(William Randall is my first cousin 8 times removed. Our common ancestors are William Randall & Rebecca Fowler.)

Friday, June 4, 2010

March 1720, Connecticut

March 24, 1720- Elizabeth Blake, wife of Joseph Johnson, dies at the age of 42 in Middletown, Connecticut.

(Elizabeth Blake is my seventh great grandaunt. Our common ancestor is Sarah Hall.)

Thursday, June 3, 2010

March 1720, Rhode Island


Common Burial Ground Cemetery, Newport, Rhode Island

March 16, 1720- Elizabeth Lawton, widow of Peleg Sherman, dies at the age of 82 in Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island.
Elizabeth and Peleg had thirteen children: Thomas, William, Daniel, Mary, Peleg, Ann, Elizabeth, Samuel, Eber, John, Benjamin, Sarah, and Isabel.

(Elizabeth Lawton is my ninth great grandaunt. Our common ancestors are Thomas Lawton & Elizabeth Salisbury.)

Wednesday, June 2, 2010

1720 Maryland


Reconstructed dwelling at St. Mary's City archealogical site in southern Maryland.

1720- John Worland III is born to John Worland II & Stacey Robey in Charles County, Maryland. It is assumed that his first wife, Rebecca, was born about the same year. But, we know little about her.

James Robey is born to John Robey & Sarah Smallwood in Charles County, Maryland.

James Pike is born to Archibald Pike & Mildred Thompson in St. Mary's County, Maryland.

Elizabeth Skeen is born in St. Mary's County, Maryland.

Thomas Newton is born to Thomas & Katherine Newton in St. Mary's County, Maryland.

Thomas Thompson & Jane Tant are married in Charles County, Maryland. Their son, Joseph, is born later that year.

(John Worland III is my fourth great grandfather. James Robey is John's first cousin.
James Robey is my first cousin 6 times removed. Our common ancestors are John Robey & Sarah Hines Luckett.
James Pike is my fifth great grandfather.
Elizabeth Skeen is my fifth great grandmother.
Thomas Newton is my fifth great granduncle.
Jane Tant is my first cousin 8 times removed. Joseph Thompson is my second cousin 7 times removed. Our common ancestor is Robert Drury.)

Back to the Revolution


I recently applied for membership in the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. I attended my first meeting last week, and I expect my membership to be confirmed in September when my local chapter reconvenes following their summer hiatus.
I was also able to visit DAR National Headquarters in Continental Hall when I visited Washington, DC in April.
My qualifying patriot ancestor is John Worland. I chose John as we share our name.
It's now time to look back towards the American Revolution, and learn more about those who served. My supplemental ancestors possibly include Peter Gideon, John Conard, John Sisson, and Solomon Hardy. I need to look deeper into the lives of these and other members of my ancestral family.